New Florida Laws Went into Effect July 1, 2019

Here are some new Florida State laws that I find noteworthy:

Tree Trimming
SB 1400 allows property owners to trim or remove trees on their property without a permit as long as they have a letter from a certified arborist or landscape architect stating the tree is a danger.* This change should save homeowners time and money in the permit process.

Banning vegetable garden restrictions
Floridians, yes we can turn our front yards into vegetable gardens! A new law established in SB82 prevents local governments from prohibiting them. The issue has come up numerous times nationwide when local governments deemed that front yard vegetable gardens are not aesthetically attractive. In one instance, a Miami Shores couple had to uproot their vegetable garden. My review of the City of St. Petersburg’s ordinances leaves me unclear if there is anything that would prohibit them. This new law makes it clear. I know I have seen several front yard vegetable gardens in St. Pete, including my own neighborhood of Central Oak Park.

This article in the Tampa Bay Times elaborates on the subject. Homeowners associations may have their own rules. Also note that ordinances designed to allow access to the right-of-way and to allow clear road views may still apply.

Open Permits
HB 447 allows local governments to close a permit six years after its issuance as long as no apparent safety hazards exist. It also prevents local governments from penalizing property owners for an open permit that was applied for by a previous owner. This change goes into effect Oct. 1, 2019.

Red Tide
SB1552 establishes the Florida Red Tide Mitigation and Technology Development Initiative – a partnership between the state and Mote Marine Laboratory to develop technologies that can control and mitigate red tide and its impact. This state bill sets aside $3 million a year for the next six years to fund the project. In addition, more than $625 million in environmental funding will be used for things like Everglades restoration, completion of the project that will raise Tamiami Trail, springs restoration, beach restoration projects, a red tide/blue green algae task force and a septic-to-sewer cost-share program.

As of now, tests show no signs of red tide in the Gulf. Testing is reported on the Florida Fish & Wildlife’s website “Red Tide Status.” Scientists are forecasting a “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico this year due to high levels of rain. Read more about this dead zone here.

*Please consult with an arborist before cutting down trees.
Additional reference: Florida Realtors

 

 

Posted on July 1, 2019 at 8:04 pm
Michelle Anderson | Category: Home Ownership, St. Petersburg

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